[Modern Warfare] Table of Organisation and Equipment

Arkon4000

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Um das Forum und den Themenbereich mal wieder etwas zu beleben, bring ich hier mal ein paar Infos zu den Organisationsstrukturen einiger moderner Streitkräften.

Den Anfang machen die heutigen russischen Streitkräfte:




 
Zuletzt bearbeitet:

Arkon4000

Bastler
Moderator
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Weiter geht es mit den amerikanischen Streitkräften:



U.S. Army Armored Brigade Combat Team (ABCT)
U.S. Army Combined Arms Battalion (2016)



The following is an overview of the current Combined Arms Battalion (CAB) of the U.S. Army Armored Brigade Combat Team (ABCT) as of 2016. These are the core maneuver battalions of the ABCT and are the U.S. Army's primary mechanized infantry and armor battalions.

Changes were made to the CAB in 2016, taking the battalion from 4 companies to 3 companies with 2 variations. One variation is biased towards armor while the other is biased towards infantry. An ABCT will have 1 Infantry CAB and 2 Armor CABs. This article covers both.

The next level up is the Armored Brigade Combat Team which consists of 1 Headquarters, 3 Combined Arms Battalions (this), 1 Brigade Engineer Battalion, 1 Cavalry Squadron, 1 Field Artillery Battalion, and 1 Brigade Support Battalion.



Combined Arms Battalion (Infantry)

  • Type: Combined Arms Battalion
  • Origin: U.S. Army (United States)
  • Integral Personnel: 40 Officers and 474 Enlisted
  • Attached Personnel: 10 Officers, 1 WO, 161 Enlisted

1Ă— Headquarters & Headquarters Company (HHC)
  • 1Ă— Command Group— 12 Officers, 24 Enlisted
    • 1Ă— Intelligence Section (S2)
    • 1Ă— Operations Section (S3)
    • 1Ă— Fire Support Section
    • 1Ă— Liaison Officer (LNO)
    • 1Ă— Tactical Air Control Party (USAF Personnel)
  • 1Ă— Combat Trains— 5 Officers, 22 Enlisted
    • 1Ă— Personnel Section (S1)
    • 1Ă— Logistics Section (S4)
    • 1Ă— Communication Section (S6)
    • 1Ă— Unit Ministry Team (UMT)
  • 1Ă— Retransmission Team — 3 Enlisted
  • 1Ă— Scout Platoon — 1 Officer, 35 Enlisted
  • 1Ă— Heavy Mortar Platoon — 1 Officer, 23 Enlisted
  • 1Ă— Sniper Squad — 10 Enlisted
  • 1Ă— Medical Treatment Platoon — 4 Officers, 32 Enlisted
  • 1Ă— Mine Roller Sections — 1 Enlisted each
  • 1Ă— Company Headquarters — 2 Officers, 5 Enlisted
  • 1Ă— Attached Fire Support Cell* — 3 Officers, 21 Enlisted
  • 1Ă— Attached Fire Support Platoon** — 2 Officers, 5 Enlisted

*Attached from Field Artillery Battalion. Attached Fire Support Cell is with the Command Group Fire Support Sect. when deployed.
**Attached from Field Artillery Battalion.


2Ă— Mechanized Rifle Company
  • 1Ă— Company Headquarters — 2 Officers, 10 Enlisted
  • 3Ă— Rifle Platoons — 1 Officer, 40 Enlisted each

1Ă— Armor Companies
  • 1Ă— Company Headquarters — 2 Officers, 12 Enlisted
  • 3Ă— Tank Platoons — 1 Officer, 15 Enlisted each

1Ă— Forward Support Company*
  • 1Ă— Company Headquarters — 2 Officers, 2 Enlisted
  • 1Ă— Field Feeding Section — 15 Enlisted
  • 1Ă— Distribution Platoon — 1 Officer, 30 Enlisted
  • 1Ă— Maintenance Platoon — 2 Officers, 1 Warrant Officer, 91 Enlisted
*Attached from Brigade Support Battalion.



Combined Arms Battalion (Armor)

  • Type: Combined Arms Battalion
  • Origin: U.S. Army (United States)
  • Integral Personnel: 40 Officers and 400 Enlisted
  • Attached Personnel: 10 Officers, 1 WO, 161 Enlisted

1Ă— Headquarters & Headquarters Company (HHC)
  • 1Ă— Command Group— 12 Officers, 24 Enlisted
    • 1Ă— Intelligence Section (S2)
    • 1Ă— Operations Section (S3)
    • 1Ă— Fire Support Section
    • 1Ă— Liaison Officer (LNO)
    • 1Ă— Tactical Air Control Party (USAF Personnel)
  • 1Ă— Combat Trains— 5 Officers, 22 Enlisted
    • 1Ă— Personnel Section (S1)
    • 1Ă— Logistics Section (S4)
    • 1Ă— Communication Section (S6)
    • 1Ă— Unit Ministry Team (UMT)
  • 1Ă— Retransmission Team — 3 Enlisted
  • 1Ă— Scout Platoon — 1 Officer, 35 Enlisted
  • 1Ă— Heavy Mortar Platoon — 1 Officer, 23 Enlisted
  • 1Ă— Sniper Squad — 10 Enlisted
  • 1Ă— Medical Treatment Platoon — 4 Officers, 32 Enlisted
  • 2Ă— Mine Roller Sections — 1 Enlisted each
  • 1Ă— Company Headquarters — 2 Officers, 5 Enlisted
  • 1Ă— Attached Fire Support Cell* — 3 Officers, 21 Enlisted
  • 1Ă— Attached Fire Support Platoon** — 2 Officers, 5 Enlisted

*Attached from Field Artillery Battalion. Attached Fire Support Cell is with the Command Group Fire Support Sect. when deployed.
**Attached from Field Artillery Battalion.


1Ă— Mechanized Rifle Company
  • 1Ă— Company Headquarters — 2 Officers, 10 Enlisted
  • 3Ă— Rifle Platoons — 1 Officer, 40 Enlisted each

2Ă— Armor Companies
  • 1Ă— Company Headquarters — 2 Officers, 12 Enlisted
  • 3Ă— Tank Platoons — 1 Officer, 15 Enlisted each

1Ă— Forward Support Company*
  • 1Ă— Company Headquarters — 2 Officers, 2 Enlisted
  • 1Ă— Field Feeding Section — 15 Enlisted
  • 1Ă— Distribution Platoon — 1 Officer, 30 Enlisted
  • 1Ă— Maintenance Platoon — 2 Officers, 1 Warrant Officer, 91 Enlisted
*Attached from Brigade Support Battalion.

Discussion

The Combined Arms Battalion (CAB) is the primary maneuver unit of the Armored Brigade Combat Team (ABCT; Heavy Brigade Combat Team before 2012). Since 2016, the CAB has had a hetergenous organization within ABCTs. Prior, CABs consisted principally of 2 Armor Companies and 2 Mechanized Infantry Rifle Companies. Following, CABs either consist of 1 Armor Company and 2 Mechanized Rifle Companies or 2 Armor Companies and 1 Mechanized Rifle Company. There are typically 1 of the former and 2 of the latter type per ABCT. The most noteworthy features of the CAB are the M1A1/M1A2 Abrams main battle tanks and M2A3 Bradley infantry fighting vehicles, composing the US Army's main armored force. As such, Armored BCTs are more oriented towards high-intensity, conventional warfare, although they did operate in Iraq in a counter-insurgency capacity following the initial invasion.

The ABCT is the heaviest basic unit of maneuver within the US Army. Their tracked armored vehicles compare to the wheeled Stryker BCT (motorized infantry with potential upgrade to mechanized infantry through Dragoon upgrades) and Infantry BCTs (who are organizationally footmobile with potential for motorization with light trucks or MRAPs when in theatre). This means CABs have the most firepower of any of the other BCT maneuver battalions and are very tactically mobile (especially when compared to Infantry BCTs). However, the logistical burden of a large amount of armored vehicles increases costs and reduces deployability. Further, many of the Armored BCTs advantages are negated by complex terrain. Deployability concerns can be mitigated by planning and by virtue of the fact that large conventional operations that'd explicitly require an Armored BCT would typically be heavily supported (and thus require a large airlift and/or sealift effort anyways) and have significant time in preparation. For more urgent, rapid reaction type scenarios that require immediate airlift delivery, an Infantry BCT would be more appropriate. In terms of deployability and firepower, the Stryker BCTs are essentially a middle of the road intermediary between the Infantry and Armored BCTs.

The Combined Arms Battalion consists of a Battalion HHC (headquarters and headquarters company), 3 maneuver companies, and a Forward Support Company attached from the Armored BCT's Brigade Support Battalion. The battalion comes under the overall command of a Lieutenant Colonel.

The Battalion HHC serves as the primary command and combat support element of the CAB, as well as providing combat service functions and leadership. One of the distinct features of CABs versus legacy tank or mechanized battalions is the presence of both armor and infantry leadership in the battalion. In both Armor and Infantry CABs, the Battalion Commander is allotted an Abrams main battle tank for combat (presumably so they are not limited by the lesser protection of the M2A3 Bradley if they need to travel with an Armor Company). The HHC includes an important portion of the Combat Trains, as well as a Scout Platoon (in HMMVW trucks and M3A3 Bradleys), 120mm Heavy Mortars, Sniper Squad, and Medical Treatment Platoon with M113 ambulances and combat medics to be attached to the companies. There is also 1 Mine Roller Section per Armor Company, which consist of an M916A1 tractor and semi-trailer for hauling 3 mine clearing blades and 1 mine clearing roller for attachment to Abrams tanks. Three Bradleys with fire support personnel and forward observers are also typically attached from the brigade's Field Artillery Battalion to be attached to the maneuver companies. A Company Intelligence Support Team (COIST) is also typically attached to the battalion intelligence staff from the brigade Military Intelligence Company (BEB) with a Company Intelligence Analyst) being made available to each company.

The Forward Support Company (FSC) attached from the Brigade Service Battalion provides additional combat service support. This includes a Field Feeding Section (battalion mess), ammunition/equipment/petrol distribution services, field maintenance, and armored recovery. Field Maintenance Teams can be attached from the FSC to Armor and Mechanized Infantry Company trains for second-line maintenance and recovery. These teams include an M88A2 IRV "Hercules" recovery vehicle (for Armor Companies) or M88A1 Medium recovery vehicle (for Mechanized Infantry Companies), an M7 Forward Repair System mounted on a PLS Transporter, an M984A1 HEMTT Wrecker, an M1084 cargo truck, and 2 HMMVW trucks. Key personnel include a Motor Sergeant, general mechanics, Abrams systems specialists, Bradley mechanics, and wheeled vehicle mechanics.

The CAB's maneuver elements are the mechanized infantry Rifle Company and Armor Company. We have dedicated articles on these formations you can read if you want to know exactly what personnel each type of company has, but the Sparknotes is Rifle Companies are mechanized infantry mounted in M2A3 Bradleys and Armor Companies are M1A2 or M1A1 Abrams main battle tanks. Both companies are broadly organized the same, with 1 Company Headquarters (2 armored fighting vehicles each) and 3 Platoons (with 4 vehicles each). Supporting non-combat elements in their Company Headquarters are broadly identical. A Company Intelligence Analyst, Emergency Care/Combat Medic personnel, and a Fire Support Team (FIST) with their own Bradley are typically attached to maneuver companies. In some cases the FIST's Bradley can replaced the integral M113 as a mobile armored command post. For Armor Companies, a Field Maintenance Team is usually attached. The CAB commander may task organize their Rifle Companies and Armor Companies into Armor and Mechanized Infantry Company Teams, forming ad hoc combined arms companies able to conduct a wide range of close combat missions.

Such task organizations can be used to negate the disadvantages inherent to infantry and tanks through mutual combined arms support. One of the most significant issues the Company Team addresses is the tank's limited use in retaining ground that has been taken and more limited situational awareness during security; roles more suited to the infantry. Infantry are also more well suited to assymetrical threats and are generally more versatile in their delivery, while tanks have the advantage in lethality and survivability.

At the same time, there has been concern raised by some that the reorganization of specialist battalions into combined arms battalions reduces the core competency of the unit as a whole. The fact that US Army officers cycle out of tactical command billets into non-tactical staff positions outside of an ABCT periodically, thus reducing the time an officer can gain competency and hone skill, is reduced. This contrasts with the Russian system, where tactical commanders typically don't cycle through non-tactical staff positions. Further, because Russian brigades retain pure battalions, there is a clear throughline from tank platoon leader, to the tank company, to the tank battalion. Thus, a Russian battalion commander typically has more experience as a commanding officer or deputy commanding officer in their specific competency than their American equivalent. It could be argued that CABs combine two types of units with very different training and sustainment requirements under the command of individuals that may or may not have significant experience in either the armor or mechanized infantry fields. This presents the interesting question of whether the close integration of the CAB is superior or inferior to pure Tank Battalions and Mechanized Infantry Battalions that can train in their own domains and be task organized at the brigade-level with other types of companies when needed.

Comparable Units Abroad
  • The Russian Grounds Forces don't typically operate combined arms battalions on a permanent basis, but brigades usually deploy their subunits as either ad hoc, combined arms Battalion Tactical Groups (BTG) or Company Tactical Groups (CTG). The BTG is the most directly applicable comparison, typically being a reinforced Motorized Rifle Battalion or Tank Battalion with a reinforcing Tank or Motorized Rifle Company respectively and additional brigade-level fires and sustainment. While it appears to be a goal for the Russians to make its brigades entirely deployable as 2-3 BTGs, unlike the American case it seems as though the choice of deploying only 1/3rd of the brigade maneuver elements is at least partially influenced by manpower concerns. The BTG isn't a new concept in the Russian practice, however, originating within the Forward Detachments of Soviet Motorized Rifle or Tank Regiments and organized in a similar manner.
  • The Swedish Army's Mechanized Battalions are organized similarly to the pre-2016 CAB, with 2 Tank Companies mounted in Strv 122 tanks and 2 Mechanized Companies mounted in Strf 9040.
  • The equivalent concept in the British Army is the Battlegroup, which are task organized formations formed around either an Infantry Battalion or Armoured Regiment (different terminology, but both battalion sized) within an Armoured Infantry Brigade. Unlike CABs these are not permanent formations and can be reformed at the brigade-level to meet different threats. Armoured Brigades would probably have about 3 to 4 Battlegroups depending on composition. A possible example composition could be 2 Armoured Infantry Companies (see our article on the platoon) and 1 Armored Squadron. These could also be formed with Heavy Protected Mobility Infantry Companies, with each brigade typically having 1 Armoured Regiment, 2 Armoured Infantry Battalions, and 1 Heavy Protected Mobility Battalion.
  • The French Army's equivalent is the Combined Arms Battle Group (Groupement tactique interarmes or GTIA) which are essentially regiments (battalion-sized formations) reinforced with other combat arms and fires/sustainment from the brigade-level. The infantry-dominant versions are structured basically as 3 infantry companies and 1 tank company. The Battle Group is the first level at which combined arms formations take place.

Sources
  • MCoE Supplemental Manual 3-90 Force Structure Reference Data "Armored Brigade Combat Team" published October 2016
  • ATP 3-90.1 "Armor and Mechanized Infantry Company Team" published January 2016
  • FM 3-96 "Brigade Combat Team" published October 2015
  • Norris, Pete (2016) "Maximizing the Lethality of Armored Forces" published on The Strategy Brigade

Quelle


U.S. Army Armor Company (Current)



The following is the current organization of the Armor Company of the U.S. Army as of roughly the late 2000s or early 2012s. These companies are armed with the M1A1 and M1A2 Abrams main battle tank as the Combined Arms Battalion and U.S. Army's basic tactical armor unit.

The next level up is the Combined Arms Battalion (CAB), part of the Armored Brigade Combat Team (ABCT). After 2016, the Combined Arms Battalion consisted of 1 HQ & HQ Company (HHC) and a mix of 3 Armor or Mechanized Infantry Companies. An ABCT will have 2 CABs that have 2 Armor Companies and 1 Mechanized Infantry Company, while 1 CAB will have 2 Mechanized Infantry Companies and 1 Armor Company.

Prior to 2016, each Combined Arms Battalion uniformly consisted of 1 HQ & HQ Company (HHC), 2 Armor Companies and 2 Mechanized Infantry Companies.

The ABCT's Cavalry Squadron also has 1 Armor Company in addition to 1 HQ & HQ Troop (HHT) and 3 Cavalry Troops.

Organization
  • Type: Tank Company
  • Origin: U.S. Army (United States)
  • Time Frame: 21st Century
  • Personnel: 5 Officers and 57 Enlisted

Company HQ—Headquarters Section (2 Officers and 12 Enlisted)
  • Tank 1—M1A1/M1A2 Abrams*
    • 1Ă— Company Commander, Captain (OF-2), armed with an M4A1 Carbine and M9/M17 Pistol
    • 1Ă— Gunner/Assistant Tank Commander, Sergeant (OR-5), armed with an M9/M17 Pistol
    • 1Ă— Loader, Private First Class (OR-3), armed with an M9/M17 Pistol
    • 1Ă— Driver, Specialist (OR-4), armed with an M9/M17 Pistol
  • Tank 2—M1A1/M1A2 Abrams*
    • 1Ă— Executive Officer, First Lieutenant (OF-1), armed with an M9/M17 Pistol
    • 1Ă— Gunner/Assistant Tank Commander, Sergeant (OR-5), armed with an M9/M17 Pistol
    • 1Ă— Loader, Private (OR-1) to Specialist (OR-4), armed with an M9/M17 Pistol
    • 1Ă— Driver, Specialist (OR-4), armed with an M9/M17 Pistol
  • M113A3 Armored Personnel Carrier
    • 1Ă— First Sergeant, First Sergeant (OR-8), armed with an M4A1 Carbine
    • 1Ă— Carrier Driver, Specialist (OR-4), armed with an M9/M17 Pistol
  • Cargo Truck with 400-gallon Water Trailer (Supply Section)
    • 1Ă— Supply Sergeant, Staff Sergeant (OR-6), armed with an M4A1 Carbine
    • 1Ă— Armorer, Specialist (OR-4), armed with an M4A1 Carbine
  • M1165A1 HMMWV Truck**
    • 1Ă— Company Commander***
    • 1Ă— Forward Signal Support NCO, Sergeant (OR-5), armed with an M4A1 Carbine
  • M1165A1 HMMWV Truck**
    • 1Ă— Executive Officer***
    • 1Ă— Tank Commander/Company Master Gunner, Staff Sergeant (OR-6), armed with an M4A1 Carbine
* Two M4A1 Carbines issued per tank.
** Perscribed HMMWV model shown, but can be substituted with a range of models
** When not mounted in a tank.


3Ă— Platoons (1 Officer and 15 Enlisted each)
  • A Section
    • Tank 1—M1A1/M1A2 Abrams*
      • 1Ă— Platoon Leader, Second/First Lieutenant (OF-1), armed with an M9/M17 Pistol
      • 1Ă— Gunner/Assistant Tank Commander, Sergeant (OR-5), armed with an M9/M17 Pistol
      • 1Ă— Loader, Private First Class (OR-3), armed with an M9/M17 Pistol
      • 1Ă— Driver, Specialist (OR-4), armed with an M9/M17 Pistol
    • Tank 2—M1A1/M1A2 Abrams*
      • 1Ă— Tank Commander, Staff Sergeant (OR-6), armed with an M9/M17 Pistol
      • 1Ă— Gunner/Assistant Tank Commander, Sergeant (OR-5), armed with an M9/M17 Pistol
      • 1Ă— Loader, Private First Class (OR-3), armed with an M9/M17 Pistol
      • 1Ă— Driver, Specialist (OR-4), armed with an M9/M17 Pistol
  • B Section
    • Tank 4—M1A1/M1A2 Abrams*
      • 1Ă— Platoon Sergeant, Sergeant First Class (OR-7), armed with an M9/M17 Pistol
      • 1Ă— Gunner/Assistant Tank Commander, Sergeant (OR-5), armed with an M9/M17 Pistol
      • 1Ă— Loader, Private First Class (OR-3), armed with an M9/M17 Pistol
      • 1Ă— Driver, Specialist (OR-4), armed with an M9/M17 Pistol
    • Tank 3—M1A1/M1A2 Abrams*
      • 1Ă— Tank Commander, Staff Sergeant (OR-6), armed with an M9/M17 Pistol
      • 1Ă— Gunner/Assistant Tank Commander, Sergeant (OR-5), armed with an M9/M17 Pistol
      • 1Ă— Loader, Private First Class (OR-3), armed with an M9/M17 Pistol
      • 1Ă— Driver, Specialist (OR-4), armed with an M9/M17 Pistol
* Each tank can carry up to 42 rounds of 120-mm main gun ammo on the M1A2 and 40 rounds on the M1A1, 900 rounds of .50 caliber machine gun ammo and 11,400 rounds of 7.62mm machine gun ammo. Two M4A1 Carbines are issued per tank.

Typical Attachments
Field Maintenance Team (from CAB Forward Service Company from BSB)
  • M1165A1 HMMWV Truck
    • 1Ă— Motor Sergeant, Sergeant First Class (OR-7), armed with an M4A1 Carbine
    • 1Ă— Abrams Systems Maintainer, Sergeant (OR-5), armed with an M4A1 Carbine
    • 1Ă— Abrams Systems Maintainer, Private First Class (OR-3), armed with an M249 Machine Gun
  • M1152A1 HMMWV Truck with Shop Equipment
    • 1Ă— Senior Abrams Systems Maintainer, Staff Sergeant (OR-6), armed with an M4A1 Carbine
    • 1Ă— Abrams Systems Maintainer, Private First Class (OR-3), armed with an M249 Machine Gun
  • M1083 Cargo Truck with M1095 Trailer
    • 1Ă— Abrams Systems Maintainer, Sergeant (OR-5), armed with an M4A1 Carbine
    • 1Ă— Abrams Systems Maintainer, Specialist (OR-4), armed with an M4A1 Carbine
  • PLS M1075A1 Transporter with M7 Forward Repair System and M1076 Trailer
    • 1Ă— Abrams Systems Maintainer, Specialist (OR-4), armed with an M4A1 Carbine
    • 1Ă— Abrams Systems Maintainer, Private First Class (OR-3), armed with an M249 Machine Gun
    • 1Ă— Automated Logistical Specialist, Specialist (OR-4), armed with an M249 Machine Gun
  • M88A2 Hercules Recovery Vehicle
    • 1Ă— Recovery Vehicle Operator, Sergeant (OR-5), armed with an M9/M17 Pistol
    • 1Ă— Recovery Vehicle Operator, Specialist (OR-4), armed with an M9/M17 Pistol
Fire Support Team (from CAB Fire Support Battalion from Field Artillery Battalion)
  • M2A3 Bradley Infantry Fighting Vehicle
    • 1Ă— Company Fire Support Officer, First Lieutenant (OF-1), armed with an M4A1 Carbine
    • 1Ă— Fire Support Sergeant, Staff Sergeant (OR-6), armed with an M4A1 Carbine
    • 1Ă— Fire Support Specialist, Specialist (OR-4), armed with an M4A1 Carbine
    • 1Ă— Fire Support Specialist, Private First Class (OR-3), armed with an M4A1 Carbine
Attached Medical (from CAB HHC)
  • M113A3 Armored Ambulance (Ambulance Squad)
    • 1Ă— Emergency Care Sergeant, Sergeant (OR-5), armed with an M9/M17 Pistol
    • 1Ă— Ambulance Aide/Driver, Specialist (OR-4), armed with an M9/M17 Pistol
    • 1Ă— Ambulance Aide/Driver, Private First Class (OR-3), armed with an M9/M17 Pistol
    • 1Ă— Combat Medic, Specialist (OR-4), armed with an M9/M17 Pistol
Attached Intelligence for COIST (from Military Intelligence Company, BEB)
  • 1Ă— Intelligence Analyst, Private First Class (OR-3) to Staff Sergeant (OR-6), armed with an M4A1 Carbine
Combat Engineer Squad (from Combat Engineer Company, BEB)
  • M2A3 Bradley Infantry Fighting Vehicle or M7 BFIST
    • 1Ă— Squad Leader, Staff Sergeant (OR-6), armed with an M4A1 Carbine
    • 2Ă— Team Leaders, Sergeant (OR-5), armed with an M4A1 Carbine
    • 1Ă— Combat Engineer, Specialist (OR-4), armed with an M249 Machine Gun
    • 1Ă— Combat Engineer, Specialist (OR-4), armed with an M320 Grenade Launcher
    • 1Ă— Combat Engineer, Private First Class (OR-3), armed with an M249 Machine Gun
    • 1Ă— Combat Engineer, Private First Class (OR-3), armed with an M320 Grenade Launcher
    • 1Ă— Vehicle Commander, Sergeant (OR-5), armed with an M4A1 Carbine
    • 1Ă— Vehicle Gunner, Specialist (OR-4), armed with an M4A1 Carbine
    • 1Ă— Driver, Private First Class (OR-3), armed with an M4A1 Carbine

Discussion
The Armor Company is the U.S. Army's basic tactical armor unit and an integral part of its Combined Arms Battalions—themselves the maneuver battalions of Armored Brigade Combat Teams. The Armor Company serves the M1A2 Abrams and older M1A1 Abrams models of main battle tank independently or in concert with mechanized infantry in ad hoc combined-arms Armor and Mechanized Infantry Company Teams. This would typically entail replacing a Tank Platoon with a Mechanized Infantry Platoon. The company consists of a Company Headquarters and 3 Tank Platoons, serving a total of 14 tanks with a small number of supporting personnel in the Company HQ. The company largely relies on the Forward Support Company (FSC) attached to the Combined Arms Battalion from the Brigade Support Battalion for sustainment (resupply).

Company Headquarters
The Company HQ "provides the command and control, unit administration, and logistical support required to conduct unit operations." It contains the company's command personnel, as well as a small number of supporting personnel. Two M1A2 or M1A1 Abrams main battle tanks, 2 HMMVW light trucks, 1 FMTV 4x4 cargo truck (with 400-gallon water trailer), and 1 M113A3 armored personnel carrier are integral to the Company HQ.

The 2 M1 Abrams tanks have a full crew (1 commander, 1 gunner, 1 loader and 1 driver). The Company Commander (a Captain) acts as the tank commander for one of the tanks, while the Executive Officer (the company's second-in-command) commands the second. Commanding from a tank in combat—as opposed to a dedicated and more comfy command vehicle—allows the company leadership to remain reasonably close to their maneuver platoons in volatile combat conditions.

The Executive Officer, or XO, is primarily concerned with administrative tasks—such as planning sustainment, planning and liaison between attachments or battalion command—but can take over command of the company should the Company Commander become a casualty or is otherwise separated from the company.

The Company First Sergeant (1SG) commands the M113A3 armored personnel carrier, directing its Driver. During operations the M113A3 can serve as a command post in place of a tent or more informal/static CP for the company if a Bradley isn't requisitioned for the purpose from the CAB. The M113A3 is eventually planned to be replaced by the XM1283 General Purpose Armored Multi-Purpose Vehicle (AMPV)—essentially a turretless Bradley. The First Sergeant is the Company Commander's senior enlisted tactical adviser and is responsible for coordinating certain administrative/rear echelon tasks. Such tasks include processing the requisition and maintenance requests from the Platoon Sergeants, training, accountability, enforcing SOPs, assisting in sustainment and coordinating the evacuation of casualties. In the role of coordinating sustainment, this would be done in cooperation with the Supply Sergeant, Executive Officer and battalion S-4 (supply staff).

The company's 2 HMMVW trucks are driven by the company's Master Gunner (back-up Tank Commander) and Forward Signal Support NCO respectively. These HMMVWs are meant to be used by the Company Commander and Executive Officer for non-combat functions, such as liaison, or anytime not mounted in a tank. They are eventually intended to be replaced by the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV). Master Gunner is a skilled position within the company, responsible for gunnery training, coordinating with battalion S3 (operations) on that front, and assisting in gunnery maintenance. They also advise the Company Commander in gunnery and sighting. In combat, the Master Gunner can either act as the NCO in command of the wheeled vehicles in the Company HQ, ride in the M113A3, or act as the gunner of the command tank (with the dedicated gunner being shifted elsewhere).

Meanwhile, the FMTV 4x4 cargo truck is manned by the Supply Sergeant and Armorer, composing the supply section. The Supply Sergeant coordinates the sustainment of the company with both the First Sergeant and the battalion S-4. The Armorer has the secondary duty of being the company's Supply Clerk.

Attached Elements
Medical, maintenance and recovery, fire support, and intelligence personnel are typically attached to the Armor Company from elsewhere and travel with the Armor Company's train.

A Field Maintenance Team is attached from the CAB's Forward Support Company (itself attached from the Brigade Support Battalion). It is staffed primarily by a Motor Sergeant and Abrams Systems Maintainers. The team includes 2 HMMVW trucks, a cargo truck, PLS transporter with an M7 forward repair system, and an M88A2 Hercules recovery vehicle.

A Fire Support Team (FIST) is attached from the brigade Field Artillery Battalion and are carried in their own M2A3 Bradley. The team is led by the Company Fire Support Officer (FSO) who is a Lieutenant. When the company forms a Company Intelligence Support Team (COIST), the FSO is a possible chice for leading it. Additionally the FIST has a Fire Support Sergeant, and 2 Fire Support Specialists.

When the company forms and COIST, a Company Intelligence Analyst is attached from the CAB's S-2 (intelligence) staff (further attached from the Brigade Engineer Battalion's Military Intelligence Company).

Medical support attached from the CAB's HHC includes an Ambulance Squad mounted in an M113A3 armored ambulance manned by an Emergency Care Sergeant and 2 Ambulance Aides as well as 1 separate Combat Medic.

A Combat Engineer Squad may be attached from the Combat Engineer Company (BEB), riding in their own Bradley.

Tank Platoons
The Tank Platoon is the close combat element of the Armor Company. The company has a total of 3 Tank Platoons, with each platoon serving 4 M1A2 or M1A1 Abrams main battle tanks. If a Combined Arms Battalion task organizes its Armor and Mechanized Infantry Companies into company teams, companies will then be a mix of the Abram-equipped Tank Platoon and the Bradley-equipped Mechanized Infantry Platoon. In an Armor Company Team, subordinate to the Armor Company commander, the typical organization would include 2 Tank Platoons and 1 Mechanized Infantry Platoon with 4 M2A3 Bradleys and 3 Rifle Squads. Meanwhile, a Mechanized Infantry Company Team would typically consist of 2 Mechanized Infantry Platoons and 1 Tank Platoon. This combined arms approach minimizes the weaknesses of tank units—namely the difficulty holding ground without infantry and vulnerability to enemy infantry in close country and urban areas.

The platoon is commanded by the Platoon Leader—a Second or First Lieutenant—who is assisted by the Platoon Sergeant—a Sergeant First Class who advises the Platoon Leader and aids in administrative tasks, such as sustainment and managing personnel. As with the infantry, the Platoon Sergeant is responsible for coordinating CASEVAC with higher echelons. Each tank has a 4-man crew (1 commander, 1 gunner, 1 loader and 1 driver). In the tanks that the Platoon Leader and Platoon Sergeant man, they act as the tank commander. The other tanks are commanded by Staff Sergeant Tank Commanders ideally.

The platoon is split into 2 mutually supporting sections: A Section and B Section. A Section is led by the Platoon Leader, who is also responsible for the entire platoon. Meanwhile, the Platoon Sergeant leads B Section. This allows for the platoon to be split evenly into sections of 2 tanks each, which is advantageous for combined arms operations and traversing difficult terrain. If a tank is lost, a platoon could operate as a 3-tank platoon with the commander and 2 sections of 1 tank each.

The platoon does not have its own train or dedicated maintenance personnel. The Tank Commanders and the Gunner in the Platoon Leader's tank supervise the first-line maintenance of the platoons tanks. The Gunners in particular are responsible for the maintenance of the tank armament, fire control systems and communications equipment. The Loader is responsible for maintaining the tank's communications equipment, while the Driver is responsible for general vehicle maintenance. As the second highest ranking member of the tank crew after the Tank Commander, the Gunner acts as an assistant tank commander. The Loader is positioned in the turret to observe the monitors and is intended to be the least senior crewmember.

Tank crews are equipped with individual weapons—the standard service pistol—while 2 M4A1 Carbines are issued per tank for dismounted operations (OP security). The actual allotment of dismounted weapons can vary unit to unit depending on the situation, with additional M4s, grenades, AT4s, and other weapons systems being noted as have being issued in the field.

Sources
  • ATP 3-20.15 "Tank Platoon" published December 2012, Department of the Army
  • ATP 3-90.1 "Armor and Mechanized Infantry Company Team" published January 2016, Department of the Army
  • FM 3-96 "Brigade Combat Team" published October 2015, Department of the Army
  • MCoE Supplemental Manual 3-90 Force Structure Reference Data "Armored Brigade Combat Team"
  • Sobko, Serhii (2017) "THE U.S. ARMORED BRIGADE COMBAT TEAM VERSUS CURRENT HYBRID THREAT: HOW SHOULD THE U.S. ABCT BE ORGANIZED AND EQUIPPED TO ADDRESS THE CURRENT HYBRID THREAT" U.S. Army Command and General Staff College
  • GourĂ©, Daniel (2018) "The U.S. Army Is Rebuilding Its Armored Brigade Combat Teams" Lexington Institute

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SBCT

USMC
 
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China's PLAGF


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PLAGF Heavy Combined Arms Brigade Structure

Shown here is a typical structure of PLAGF heavy combined arms brigade introduced post 2015 military reform, with attached pictures of different vehicles to expect.
As it can be seen, a PLAGF HCAB consists of 9 battalions:

4x combined arms battalion
1x reconnaissance battalion
1x artillery battalion
1x air defense battalion
1x combat support battalion
1x combat service support battalion

Combined Arms Battalion
This is formed of 2 tank companies, 2 armoured infantry companies, 1 fire support company, and 1 support company. Typical vehicles include the ZTZ-99A/96A MBTs, ZBD-04A IFVs, and PLZ-10 SPHs. However, in HCABs that have yet to undergo modernisation, we may see older predecessors such as the Type 88 MBTs and Type 86 IFVs.

Reconnaissance Battalion
This typically consists of two armoured reconnaissance companies. A third company could exist depending on necessity. Vehicles in the reconnaissance battalions are typically based on the Type 89A or ZBD-04A platforms, but not restricted to the two. Rail and hand launched drones are commonly seen used by these units.

Artillery Battalion
The artillery battalion is formed from three howitzer companies, one rocket artillery company, and one ATGM company. These are usually PLZ-07 SPHs, PHZ-11 MLRs, and HJ-10 ATGMs. Although PHZ-89 MLRs can still be seen within a number of HCABs.

Air Defense Battalion
The air defense battalion consists of three anti-aircraft gun companies and two SAM companies. These are ideally HQ-17 SAMs, PGZ-95 or PGZ-09 SPAAGs. While Type 90 AAGs can be seen occasionally.

Combat Support Battalion
This consists of one battalion from each command & communication, chemical defense, engineering, ECM, and security. With an additional information assurance squadron.

Combat Service Support Battalion
Primarily tasked for logistics. Consisting three repair companies, one medic company, one transport company, and one supply assurance squadron.
 
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Deutsche Bundeswehr - 🇩🇪

German EGB-Fallschirmjägerzug (2016)

The following is the German EGB-Fallschirmjägerzug organization as of 2016. They are more highly trained paratroopers, roughly equivalent to U.S. Army Rangers in capability. The next level up is the Fallschirmjäger-Kommando-Kompanie, which consists of a company headquarters, 3 platoons (zug), and 1 heavy weapons platoon. There are two companies in each of Germany's two Fallschirmjägerregiment (being the 2nd and 3rd companies of the regiments), with each regiment also having an additional standard 3 paratrooper companies and a number of support and staff companies.

Organization
  • Type: Airborne Light Infantry Company
  • Origin: Heer (Germany)
  • Time Frame: 2016
  • Personnel: 0-1 Officers and 35-36 Enlisted
  • Vehicles: 4 TPz Fuchs or 7-8 ATF Dingos (A)

→ Platoon Headquarters (Zugtrupp) (0-1 Officers and 5-6 Enlisted)
  • 1Ă— Platoon Leader (ZugfĂĽhrer), 1 per company is a Leutnant or Oberleutnant (OF-1) while 2 per company are Hauptfeldwebel (OR-7) or Stabsfeldwebel (OR-8), armed with 1 G36K rifle or 1 MP7A1 PDW and 1 P8 pistol
  • 1Ă— Radio Operator (Funker), a Obergefreiter (OR-3) to Oberstabsgefreiter (OR-4), armed with 1 G36K rifle and 1 P8 pistol
  • 1Ă— Machine Gunner (MG-SchĂĽtze), a Obergefreiter (OR-3) to Oberstabsgefreiter (OR-4), armed with 1 MG4 light machine gun and 1 P8 pistol
  • 1Ă— Rifleman/Grenadier (GewehrschĂĽtze), a Obergefreiter (OR-3) to Oberstabsgefreiter (OR-4), armed with 1 G36K rifle with AG36 UGBL and 1 P8 pistol
  • 2Ă— Riflemen (GewehrschĂĽtze), a Obergefreiter (OR-3) to Oberstabsgefreiter (OR-4), armed with 1 G36K rifle with AG36 UGBL and 1 P8 pistol

→ 3× Paratrooper Groups (Fallschirmjägergruppe) (10 Enlisted each) (B)
  • 1Ă— Group Leader (GruppenfĂĽhrer), a Feldwebel (OR-6) to Hauptfeldwebel (OR-7), armed with 1 G36K rifle and 1 P8 pistol
  • 1Ă— Deputy Group Leader (Stellvertretender GruppenfĂĽhrer), a Hauptgefreiter (OR-3) to Unteroffizier (OR-5), armed with 1 G36K rifle and 1 P8 pistol

  • Alpha Team
    • 1Ă— Machine Gunner (M.G.-SchĂĽtze), a Obergefreiter (OR-3) to Oberstabsgefreiter (OR-4), armed with 1 MG4 light machine gun and 1 P8 pistol
    • 1Ă— Panzerfaust Operator (PanzerfaustschĂĽtze), a Obergefreiter (OR-3) to Oberstabsgefreiter (OR-4), armed with 1 G36K rifle, 1 P8 pistol, and 1 Panzerfaust 3 disposable rocket launcher
    • 1Ă— Rifleman/Grenadier (GewehrschĂĽtze), a Obergefreiter (OR-3) to Oberstabsgefreiter (OR-4), armed with 1 G36K rifle with AG36 UGBL and 1 P8 pistol
    • 1Ă— Rifleman (GewehrschĂĽtze), a Obergefreiter (OR-3) to Oberstabsgefreiter (OR-4), armed with 1 G36K rifle and 1 P8 pistol
  • Bravo Team
    • 1Ă— Machine Gunner (M.G.-SchĂĽtze), a Obergefreiter (OR-3) to Oberstabsgefreiter (OR-4), armed with 1 MG4 light machine gun and 1 P8 pistol
    • 1Ă— Panzerfaust Operator (PanzerfaustschĂĽtze), a Obergefreiter (OR-3) to Oberstabsgefreiter (OR-4), armed with 1 G36K rifle, 1 P8 pistol, and 1 Panzerfaust 3 disposable rocket launcher
    • 1Ă— Rifleman/Grenadier (GewehrschĂĽtze), a Obergefreiter (OR-3) to Oberstabsgefreiter (OR-4), armed with 1 G36K rifle with AG36 UGBL and 1 P8 pistol
    • 1Ă— Sharpshooter (ScharfschĂĽtze)(C), a Obergefreiter (OR-3) to Oberstabsgefreiter (OR-4), armed with 1 G28 marksman rifle and 1 P8 pistol

(A) If mounted in a TPz Fuchs 6x6 armored personnel carrier, vehicle crews would be drawn directly from the platoons. It would take 4 TPz Fuchs to mount the entire platoon, with one vehicle per group. If the platoon was mounted in ATF Dingo MRAPs, it the platoon would be mounted in roughly 7-8 vehicles with roughly one vehicle per team.
(B) Each company has 3 platoons and a company headquarters. One platoon is commanded by an officer (a leutenant or oberleutnant) while two platoons are commanded be a staff NCO (typically a hauptfeldwebel or stabsfeldwebel).

(C) The sharpshooter/designated marksman may also be a rifleman depending on availability, mission parameters, and personal choice. By the same token, there be more than one G28 or other rifles, such as modernized G3s, depending on the same factors. Individuals armed with marksman rifles attended a designated marksman course.

Additional Equipment

  • Additional weapons available to each platoon troop depending on personal preference and mission parameters:
    • 2Ă— MP7A1 personal defense weapon (most likely issued to the driver for the group's vehicle)
    • 1Ă— Panzerfaust 3 disposable rocket launcher
    • 1Ă— MG5 general-purpose machine gun
  • Additional weapons available to each group depending on personal preference and mission parameters:
    • 2Ă— MP7A1 personal defense weapon (most likely issued to the drivers for the group's vehicles)
    • 1Ă— MG82A1 anti-materiel rifle
    • 1Ă— MG5 general-purpose machine gun
  • There is photographic evidence of the use of modern G3 rifles by the EGB in the place of the machine gun in Afghanistan.

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Die Schweizer Armee - 🇨🇭

Swiss Army Rifle Squad (21st Century)

Timeframe Included:
2019

The following is the current organization of the Swiss Army's rifle squad. This information is based upon personal consultation with a Swiss veteran who provided the information translated from a physical French source.

The basic organization of the Swiss rifle squad is as follows:

Fire Team Bravo

  • Squad Leader (German: GruppenfĂĽhrer, French: Chef de groupe), a Wachtmeister (OR-5), armed with Sturmgewehr 90 (SIG 550) rifle with a Kern Aarau 4Ă—24 optic. The squad leader commands the squad, fire team bravo, and attends a designated marksman course.
  • Panzerfaust Operator (German: PanzerfaustschĂĽtzen, French: Tireur Panzerfaust), a Soldat (OR-1), armed with a Panzerfaust 3 and Sturmgewehr 90 rifle.
  • Machine Gunner (German: MG-SchĂĽtzen, French: Tireur Fusil-Mitrailleur), a Soldat (OR-1), armed with a Leichtes Maschinengewehr 05 (FN Minimi) light machine gun.
  • Rifleman (German: FĂĽsilier, French: Fusilier), a Soldat (OR-1), armed with a Sturmgewehr 90 rifle with an attached Gewehraufsatz 97 (SIG GL 5040) 40mm under-barrel grenade launcher.

Fire Team Alpha
  • Fire Team Leader (German: TruppfĂĽhrer, French: Chef d’équipe), a Gefreiter (OR-2), armed with Sturmgewehr 90 (SIG 550) rifle with a Kern Aarau 4Ă—24 optic. The fire team leader leads fire team alpha and attends a designated marksman course.
  • Panzerfaust Operator (German: PanzerfaustschĂĽtzen, French: Tireur Panzerfaust), a Soldat (OR-1), armed with a Panzerfaust 3 and Sturmgewehr 90 rifle.
  • Machine Gunner (German: MG-SchĂĽtzen, French: Tireur Fusil-Mitrailleur), a Soldat (OR-1), armed with a Leichtes Maschinengewehr 05 (FN Minimi) light machine gun.
  • Rifleman (German: FĂĽsilier, French: Fusilier), a Soldat (OR-1), armed with a Sturmgewehr 90 rifle with an attached Gewehraufsatz 97 (SIG GL 5040) 40mm under-barrel grenade launcher.

In essence, the Alpha Fire Team (German: Trupp Alpha; French: Équipe Alpha) fills the assault role. For example, on patrol, the Alpha Fire Team takes point while the Bravo Fire Team led by the squad leader follows. Additionally, Alpha Team would be charged with breaching a structure if needed. Bravo Fire Team (German: Trupp Bravo; French: Équipe Bravo) can be considered the support component of the squad. In terms of doctrine, this is similar to the Russian motorized rifle squad method of assault where the squad leader remains with the fire group (a squad automatic weapon and RPG-7) and the senior rifleman leads the riflemen in the maneuver group.

Each Panzerfaust operator only carries one round worth of Panzerfaust 3 ammunition. With the Panzerfaust 3, the munition and the tube are one piece. When not in use, the tube/munition are carried on the back, while the firing unit and optic are carried in a satchel which may be attached immediately before use. At the same time, this means that if both Panzerfaust operators are placed in an ad hoc support fire team, one operator may become the primary, bringing their firing unit and optic, while the other may provide them their reload.

As for ammunition for personal small arms, this varies depending on the unit and situation. The minimum load for riflemen is 6 20-round magazines (120 rounds total) carried in a belt. An additional 10 20-round magazines (200 rounds) can be added to the load through the addition of a chest rig, with the potential for more ammunition in a ruck. The minimum ammunition load for the machine gunners is 800 rounds each with additional belts carried throughout the squad.

In addition to the allocated weapons listed above, a small 60mm mortar may be made available to the squad for the purpose of illumination during night operations. One rifleman may be designated the role of mortar man. Additionally, one rifleman could also be designated a communications specialist. If not a communications specialist, the rifleman could specialize in explosives. In this case, they would be the squad's breaching specialist.

As over 90 percent of the Swiss military is composed of conscripts, with professional officers and non-commissioned officers being the minority, squad members are typically specialized on their specific weapon system and role. Unlike some armed forces, such as the modern German Army which has most of its squad members qualify on the Panzerfaust 3 after a certain amount of service for example, the different squad members are not as interchangeable in their roles.

Platoon and Company Organization

Each Swiss rifle company consists of 4 platoons. The platoon consists of 4 squads mounted in 4 light armored vehicles. The 4 vehicles and squads are divided in two equally sized sections. The vehicles and their crews are integral to the platoon, rather than an attachment from another unit. The first section is commanded by the platoon leader (typically a Leutnant or Oberleutnant) while the second section is commanded by the assistant platoon commander (typically an Oberwachtmeister). Both the commander and assistant commander fill the role of vehicle commander for the vehicles they occupy.

The typical vehicle used by the platoon in urban environments is the Mowag DURO IIIP. In the country, the platoon would field the Mowag Piranha II. All vehicle crews are trained to operate both vehicles. Each vehicle is crewed by a driver (Soldat), a machine gunner (Soldat), and a vehicle commander (Wachtmeister) in addition to the dismounts. Although the crew does not dismount when the rest of the squad does, they are also armed with Sturmgewehr 90 rifles. The vehicle commanders and squad leaders are typically of the same rank (except in the case where the platoon commander or assistant platoon commander are also the vehicle commander). When the squad is mounted, command generally defaults to the vehicle commander who executes the orders of the platoon commander.

Typically, either the platoon commander or assistant platoon commander will dismount with the infantry. Whoever does not will assume command of the vehicles, who will act separately, but in support of the infantry. If both dismount, the senior-most vehicle commander (a wachtmeister) will assume command of the vehicles. In terms of command and control, the senior vehicle commander will then command their vehicle, the other vehicle in their section (whose commander has dismounted), and the vehicle commander remaining in the other section.

An overview of the platoon organization is as follows:

Swiss Mechanized Infantry Platoon

1st Section

  • 1st Vehicle - 1Ă— Platoon Leader/Section Leader/Vehicle Commander (Leutnant or Oberleutnant, OF-1), 1Ă— Driver (Soldat, OR-1), 1Ă— Gunner (Soldat, OR-1)
  • 1st Squad - 8-man squad (see above)
  • 2nd Vehicle - 1Ă— Vehicle Commander (Wachtmeister, OR-5), 1Ă— Driver (Soldat, OR-1), 1Ă— Gunner (Soldat, OR-1)
  • 2nd Squad - 8-man squad (see above)
2nd Section
  • 3rd Vehicle - 1Ă— Assistant Platoon Leader/Section Leader/Vehicle Commander (Oberwachtmeister, OF-5b), 1Ă— Driver (Soldat, OR-1), 1Ă— Gunner (Soldat, OR-1)
  • 3rd Squad - 8-man squad (see above)
  • 4th Vehicle - 1Ă— Vehicle Commander (Wachtmeister, OR-5), 1Ă— Driver (Soldat, OR-1), 1Ă— Gunner (Soldat, OR-1)
  • 4th Squad - 8-man squad (see above)
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Kurzer Überblick über die schwedischen Streitkräfte:

Swedish Mechanized Rifle Platoon (Current)
The following is the current organization of the Swedish Army Mechanized Infantry Rifle Platoon (Swedish: Mekaniserad Skyttepluton) as of 2020. These are Strf 9040 (CV90) Infantry Fighting Vehicle-equipped platoons integral to Mechanized Companies of Mechanized Battalions (mekaniserade bataljonen). This article incorporates rank changes that were made within the Swedish Army in late 2019.

The next level up from this is the Mechanized Company which consists of a Company Headquarters (39 men) and 3 Mechanized Rifle Platoons (this).

Organization
  • Type: Mechanized Infantry Platoon
  • Origin: Swedish Army (Sweden)
  • Personnel: 1 Officer and 29 Enlisted
→ Platoon Headquarters
  • 1Ă— Platoon Commander (Vehicle Commander), Fänrik or Löjtnant (OF-1), armed with 1 Ak 5C Rifle
  • 1Ă— Deputy Platoon Commander (Vehicle Commander), Sergeant (OR-6) or Ă–ver-sergeant (OR-7), armed with 1 Ak 5C Rifle
  • 1Ă— Vehicle Commander, Sergeant (OR-6) or Ă–ver-sergeant (OR-7), armed with 1 Ak 5C Rifle

2.png

→ 3× Mechanized Rifle Groups
  • Dismounts:
    • 1Ă— Group Commander, Furir or Ă–verfurir (OR-5), armed with 1 Ak 5C Rifle and M203 Grenade Launcher​
    • 1Ă— Deputy Group Commander, Korpral (OR-4), armed with 1 Ak 5C Rifle and M203 Grenade Launcher​
    • 1Ă— Carl Gustav Gunner/Rifleman, Menig (OR-1/) or Menig 1/2/3/4 (OR-2), armed with 1 Ak 5C Rifle and Grg m/86 Recoilless Rifle*​
    • 1Ă— Carl Gustav Loader/Rifleman, Menig (OR-1) or Menig 1/2/3/4 (OR-2), armed with 1 Ak 5C Rifle and AT-4**​
    • 1Ă— Machine Gunner, Menig (OR-1) or Menig 1/2/3/4 (OR-2), armed with 1 Ksp 58B/F (FN MAG) or Ksp 90 (Minimi) Machine Gun​
    • 1Ă— Rifleman/Combat Life Saver*, Menig (OR-1) or Menig 1/2/3/4 (OR-2) or Vicekorpral (OR-3), armed with 1 Ak 5C Rifle or 1 Ak 4D Designated Marksman Rifle and AT-4
  • Vehicle Crew:
    • 1Ă— Vehicle Gunner, Vicekorpral (OR-3), armed with 1 Ak 5C Rifle​
    • 1Ă— Vehicle Driver, Vicekorpral (OR-3), armed with 1 Ak 5C Rifle​

* Carl Gustaf is optional. If it is not taken with the dismounts, the Carl Gustaf Gunner acts as a rifleman.
** AT-4s are situational and considered optional, especially for Carl Gustav loaders carrying Carl Gustaf ammunition
*** Rifleman acts as assistant machine gunner when the squad is equipped with a Ksp 58B GPMG



→ Spare Personnel

  • 1Ă— Dismount Commander*, Sergeant (OR-6), armed with 1 Ak 5C Rifle
  • 2Ă— Reserve Vehicle Commanders**, Vicekorpral (OR-3) or Korpral (OR-4), armed with 1 Ak 5C Rifle

* Leads dismounts if Platoon Commander does not dismount. Sits with dismounts
** Replaces Platoon Commander or Deputy Platoon Commander as vehicle commander if they dismount. Only one will dismount. Sits in 7th seat in the back with the dismounts.



1.png

Vehicle Seating

→ Vehicle FA (Strf 9040)

  • 1Ă— Deputy Platoon Commander (Vehicle Commander)
  • 1Ă— Spare Vehicle Commander
  • 1Ă— Mechanized Rifle Group
→ Vehicle GA (Strf 9040)
  • 1Ă— Deputy Platoon Commander (Vehicle Commander)
  • 1Ă— Spare Vehicle Commander
  • 1Ă— Mechanized Rifle Group
→ Vehicle EA (Strf 9040)
  • 1Ă— Vehicle Commander
  • 1Ă— Dismount Commander
  • 1Ă— Mechanized Rifle Group

Discussion

The Mechanized Rifle Platoon (Mekaniserad Skyttepluton) is the principle close combat element of the Mechanized Company within the Swedish Army. Each Mechanized Battalion—common formations integral to regiments of the Swedish Army's Rapid Reaction Organisation—has 2 Tank Companies (Strv 122) and 2 Mechanized Companies (Strf 9040). Each Mechanized Rifle Platoon is equipped with 3 Strf 9040 infantry fighting vehicles, carrying 3 dismounted Mechanized Rifle Groups (Pansarskyttegrupp). This contrasts with Sweden's light infantry who typically ride in Bv 206 articulated tracked carriers.

Mechanized infantry work very closely with tank units, with typically a Mechanized Company and Tank Company being paired up for a combined arms mission. This limits the amount of time a platoon can dismount if the tanks are on the move.

The Platoon HQ (Chefsgrupp) consists of the Platoon Commander (Plutonchef), Deputy Platoon Commander (Ställföreträdande plutonchef), and a Vehicle Commander (Vagnchef). Each commands 1 of the platoon's 3 Strf 9040s. In the event that the Platoon Commander or their deputy need to dismount, each vehicle may also carry a spare Vehicle Commander who sits in the spare 7th seat in the back of the vehicle with the dismounts. The Platoon Commander is typically a Fänrik or Löjtnant (OF-1), although the rare Kapten (OF-2) Platoon Commander is possible. The Deputy is a Sergeant (OR-6) or Över-sergeant (OR-7), which would have been Förste Sergeant and Fanjunkare respectively under the old pre-2019 rank system. The Vehicle Commander is typically a Furir (OR-5), which would have been a Sergeant pre-2019, while the spare Vehicle Commanders could be Vicekorporal (OR-3) or Korporal (OR-4). All men are armed with Ak 5C assault rifles as their personal weapons.

Additionally, the platoon has three spare personnel at full strength. A Dismount Commander who is typically a Sergeant. When neither the Platoon Commander or Deputy Platoon Commander dismount, this individual leads all dismount groups. They are technically counted in the count for the Rifle Groups in playcards, essentially being spare personnel but serving a command function. In some situations, they could command one of the groups (perhaps when the Platoon Commander or Deputy dismounts). The vehicles the Platoon Commander and Deputy Platoon Commander reside in also have one spare Vehicle Commander each who can take over command of the vehicle if either dismounts. Typically, only one of the two would ever dismount (usually the Platoon Commander).

Each of the platoon's 3 Mechanized Rifle Groups (Mekaniserad skyttegrupp) consists of a 2-man vehicle crew (excluding the Vehicle Commanders) and a 6-man dismounted element. They are letter E, F and G typically, with the option of an H if a platoon is operating with 4 groups. Meanwhile, the letters A, B, C, and D represent the platoons in the company. So a group/vehicle designated "EA" is E Group, A Platoon, for example.

The crew consists of a Driver (Förare) and Vehicle Gunner (Skytt), both junior enlisted but typically Vicekorporal. The dismounted Rifle Group is led overall by a Group Commander (Gruppchef) of the rank Furir or Överfurir—the latter being essentially a distinguishing rank awarded to Furir for good service—and is assisted by a Deputy Group Commander (Ställföreträdande Gruppchef) of the rank Korporal. The groups serve one m/86 Carl Gustaf recoilless rifle—with a gunner and rifleman who carries ammo and aids in loading—and a machine gun. The Carl Gustaf is optional, however. In a case where the Carl Gustaf is not taken out, the Carl Gustaf operator would just be a rifleman. The machine gun is either a Ksp 58B/F (FN MAG) general-purpose machine gun or KsP 90 (FN Minimi) light machine gun depending on the needs of the platoon and orders of the Platoon Commander. The Ksp58F is essentially the Ksp58B but with additional rail attachments. The vehicles carry both and the platoon can field a mix of the two. The last rifleman may act as an assistant for the Machine Gunner if the group takes out the KsP 58B. This Rifleman is typically trained as a Combat Life Saver and may be armed with an Ak4D Designated Marksman Rifle—a variant of the Ak 4 which is itself a Swedish-made G3A3. If they are a professional soldier they are typically a Vicekorpral. Both Riflemen can also carry m/86 (AT-4) disposable anti-tank weapons, although these weapons are situational and optional, especially for the Carl Gustaf loader. Meanwhile, the Group Commander and Deputy Group Commander carries an M203 40mm grenade launcher. All men except for the Machine Gunner and Deputy Group Commander carry the Ak 5C rifle.

Like the light infantry variant, the Mechanized Rifle Group can be split into two teams (OmgĂĄng) of 3 men under the Group Commander or their deputy each to facilitate fire and maneuver.

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